Restart Project fixing our broken (relationship with) electronics

Last night I went to a new year party held by the social enterprise the Restart Project and heard about their achievements over the past year and plans for the future.

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I’ve previously met Restart’s founders, Janet Gunter and Ugo Vallauri to hear about their work and to explore common interests and opportunities to work together. They are hugely impressive individuals with a clear purpose and a passion that is infectious.

Restart is based on a simple premise – that our relationship with electronics is broken and we need to fix it. Whether it’s the latest must-have iPhone or broken bits of computers that fill our cupboards and drawers, it’s clear that we are, as a society, buying a lot of electronic equipment…without thinking very much about what happens to the ‘old stuff’. Electronic waste is one of the fastest growing waste streams in the UK and it’s costing a huge amount of money to dispose of redundant tech.

What the Restart Project does is encourage and empower people to use their electronics for longer by sharing repair and maintenance skills. They hold events – Restart Parties – where people are invited to bring their electronic equipment to be repaired by a team of enthusiastic volunteer repairers. Those turning up are taught new skills and encouraged to extend the lifespan of electronic devices and divert them from going into waste.

The project clearly offers so benefits on so many levels. It brings people together to interact, meet, talk and do things together, building social capital within communities. It helps people to learn new practical skills that can be used to save money and time. Among younger people ‘getting your hands dirty’ with electronics could easily lead to opening minds – and doors – to career opportunities in computing and coding or engineering; industries that the UK needs to continue to grow the availability of skilled labour in. And of course, Restart delivers on its primary purpose – to prolong the lifespan of electronic equipment, which saves people money and might just save the planet.

Everything about Restart inspires and excites me: the combination of social, economic and environmental benefits is clear and the potential huge.

I can also see the potential for technology to be redistributed to those who may not have access to even older equipment. I can remember back in the 90s taking donations of computers from companies and spending hours on end formatting old PCs and installing basic software on them to then distribute them to homelessness charities and groups.

Even though I do – I must confess – like to upgrade my phone and computer(s) every few years, I always try and find a home for the old kit. The emergence of the resale market for mobile phones over the last few years is an example of how much opportunity there is for us to make better use of old electronics.

IKEA’s head of sustainability recently suggested that we had reached ‘peak stuff’ and that consumers’ appetite for buying home furnishings had reached saturation point. If we want more new stuff, I’d suggest we need to think more about what happens to the old stuff….the Restart Project might just be the answer.